Fair Food Supermarket and Library of Things

06 Sep 2019 Fair Food Supermarket and Library of Things

If you could shop using your own containers, buy excess home grown produce, support local farmers and small business, buy homemade sweets / snacks and borrow, tools, toys and musical instruments rather than buying it yourself would you?

The biggest issue raised to why people find it difficult to support local small business and reduce the crazy excess packaging of major supermarkets is a lack of options. 

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We talk about it often and in general “convenience” has become inconvenient. Items you might only use once or twice a year are cheap and often very poor quality. So they either don’t work very well or they just take up space in your house. Big chain supermarkets often force people through packaging and pricing to buy more food than they need. Selling a kilo in plastic cheaper than loose produce. A tactic to get you to buy what they want you to buy. 

Chopping an onion up and selling it in plastic might make it easy to prepare a meal, but then you’re left with a bunch of plastic that you now have to get rid of.

Supermarkets use hooks to get you to buy more. The things they want you to buy at eye level, sugar filled junk food at the checkout, rainbow colours everywhere and pointless wasteful rubbish, such as Coles Little shop to grab your children’s attention.

In all cases the options for many around the world is a soulless, greedy, profit for them at all costs situation.

Well another community wants to change all that. The fair food supermarket and library of things aims to create an inviting community space, with items to hire, local produce, bulk foods, locally made, zero waste, affordable food and goods of all shapes and sizes. 

A group of community members in the Illawarra has won a $175,000 grant from the NSW Government to put people and planet back at the top of the shopping list.

The profit for purpose business will exist in Wentworth Street Port Kembla. The hard part will be getting the operation into a financially sustainable community business. Beyond that, excess profits can be used to assist community environmental initiatives, expand the business, offer more services and generate employment. It will also boost business in the area, giving shoppers another reason to visit the once thriving business district. Imagine if you could get supplies for dinner or a board game for the weekends entertainment at a space owned by your community. How good would that be?

Paul Hellier – Founder

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